How To Build 70-Watt Solar Panels

Posted by  




 

35 Comments Click Here To Leave A Comment...

  1. James1959 said:

    Great concept. Thanks for sharing

    [Reply]

  2. michael g said:

    very nice, I have a feed store in daytona beach fl. I would like to power my hole place with solor. How can i hook in to the ele panel and have them pay me

    [Reply]

    Mark Wells replied:

    Thanks for your comment Michael. If you wanted to hook your system up to the grid you would need a qualified electrician to do the connection. Many energy companies allow you to sell power back to them, but they each have their own criteria. For example you will probably need to install a special ‘smart meter’ that can measure the input & output of the electricity, and they may have a special requirement on the output of your panels, so you’ll need to check with your particular energy company for more details.

    [Reply]

  3. Forrest said:

    Your presentation would have been WAY more effective and appealing if it had incorporated “live video” of the actual process during his building of the solar panel. Also, what can you power with a 70 – 120 watt solar pane in your home? It doesn’t seem like it would be very helpful. I know you can build more for more wattage, but how many would you have to build to be effectively off-setting energy costs?

    Thanks – Forrest

    [Reply]

    Mark Wells replied:

    Thanks for your comment Forrest. I will be sending out some live video over the next few days, so stay tuned!

    There are a few things a single 70 – 120 Watt Panel can power including lighting, stereo, radio, ceiling fan, laptop, electric blanket, food mixer, and many other smaller output devices.

    The standard output of normal “retail” installations is around 100 Watts per panel. You can build an array of panels if you want to power your entire home. What I have shown you is a method of building the same type of panels used in a “retail” system, but at a much cheaper cost. If you wanted a 2 Kilowatt system, you could build around 16 x 120 Watt panels.

    [Reply]

  4. Sani said:

    I LOVE THIS DEMONSTRATION.. IT IS A GREAT IDEA …ID LIKE TO SHARE THIS WITH UNDER PRIVILEDGE COUNTRIES..E G ..FIJI (MY HOME) THANKS GUYS BLESS U..

    [Reply]

  5. mike s. said:

    Thanks,I think I can do it! Can I borrow a 120.00 dollars? (just kidding)

    [Reply]

  6. barry stone said:

    Thanks for the video. Well done for making it free and helping people to learn about it.

    [Reply]

  7. Gary Compton said:

    Hello, Great job simplefying the process of DIY solar panels. I have one concern. What is the longterm effects of moisture. Are your panels sealed and do they have a moisture obsorbent (silicgjell). I am well into my first panel and sofar ist is very easy. I purchased untabed cells and the added labor was not bad, about two Hours work.

    [Reply]

  8. chuck knotts said:

    I have a small 110 welder with a output of 85 amp . It is a inverter technology system. How can figure what I need for the system.

    [Reply]

  9. Lawrence Alger said:

    Thanks Mark very interesting!

    [Reply]

  10. Michael Scott said:

    MarK;; You need more pictures and close ups for the soldering process and the wire connections. You do not have anything beyond the building of the panels. You need to add more information for the number of 70 – 120 watt panels will be needed to power a normal house.

    What happens when the batteries are too low to power your load. The other side is what happens when you generate more power than you use or when the batteries are full? This can be sold to the Energy Company and make money.

    mscott@aniram.org

    [Reply]

    Mark Wells replied:

    Thanks for your comment Michael. We’re working on a video to show you the specific steps of soldering – so keep an eye on your inbox. The number of panels you need to power your house will depend on your energy requirements. For a 2 Kilowatt system you can build an array of 16 of the 120 Watt panels.

    Here’s a helpful calculator to find out how much energy your house uses and how many panels you’ll need if you want to completely solar power your home:

    http://www.freesunpower.com/system_sizing.php

    If the batteries are ever too low to power your load, your inverter will block the flow of current. You have a few options; if you want to be completely self-sufficient you can then switch to a backup generator. If you live in a windy area, you can have a duel wind power / solar power set up.

    Mostly though, when someone runs out of solar power, they’ll just start using mains power until their battery / battery bank is charged again. The majority of people who are building D.I.Y. Solar Panels do so to cut down their electricity bills. So they’ll build a few panels to power a few of their appliances with free power and use to the mains power for everything else. You can build more panels over time and add to your array to cut back more and more off your energy bills incrementally.

    Now, on the other hand if you are generating excess power, some energy companies will let you sell it back to them so check the requirements of your particular company. They’ll need a ‘smart meter’ installed to monitor the flow of energy.

    [Reply]

  11. nderdawg@yahoo.com said:

    You have a lot of good information here. It would have been more interesting if you would have shown your brother actually putting the panel together instead of putting words on the screen and reading along. You didn’t mention how big of a blob of silicone is needed to stick the panels to the ply, so seeing him do it would have been helpful. I don’t know the consequences (if there are any) of using too large of a blob, but not using enough wouldn’t hold the panel in place. Just my observation. You’re doing good. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Mark Wells replied:

    Thanks for the comment. I’ve got some ‘footage’ of Cain building this panel on video, so I will be releasing that soon. Re. the silicone: Try to ensure that the silicon blobs are a bit wider than 2/5 of an inch or 10mm and try to keep the blobs consistent.

    [Reply]

  12. Tom Junier said:

    How do i get a detailed parts list. I would like to build one or two. I am tired of going camping and having to run the generator every three days, this would help save fuel. who knows I may see how this goes to build one for my house…

    [Reply]

    Mark Wells replied:

    Thanks for your comment Tom. I’m putting together a more detailed parts list, so stay tuned!

    [Reply]

  13. Joe Kamier said:

    My electric power company (Pacific Gas and Electric, Inc) is said to allow the output of a customer’s solar power to be fed somehow into the company’s power for the customer’s house. The hookup is said to reflect, at the company’s meter box in the customer’s residence, the reduction in the use of company power. This arrangement would be much more convenient than using the solar power only for operating lights or appliances independently of the power company.
    How would one go about achieving this integration of the two power sources?

    [Reply]

  14. Harry Lynn said:

    G’day Mark,
    Mate, I think you need to use a POP filter on your microphone to get much clearer sound. A cheap way to do that is to wrap some foam [ 1-2 cm thick ] around the grille and hold it on with a cable tie or rubber band. That may remove the wind noise on the recording. Better still is to get a Shure SM 58 microphone. The best !
    The content is fabulous, and I love it. Can the same type of cells be used as a permanent installation on a house’s roof ? How do insurance companies view DIY cells ? As a rental house owner, am I covered for any problems with the cells ?
    Cheers
    Harry

    [Reply]

  15. Rod Cronin said:

    Good video, I’ve got my pv cells, wire and blocking diodes. Just need the timber and sticky stuff and I’ll be at it.
    Rod

    [Reply]

  16. Manny said:

    Although I have subscribed to your blog for quite a while now, this is the first time I had time to read it and watched your videos. I found it very informative. It aroused my interest very much about DIY Solar Panel, although I have been doing research on renewable energy for years now.

    [Reply]

  17. rabaud said:

    this enthuses me and when I can arrange the time, I will look at it deeper and get your book. thanks

    [Reply]

  18. tim h. said:

    Thanks for the info it is very helpful to get the wife converted

    [Reply]

  19. Ruel said:

    Hi Mark, solar power can be effective only during daytime, where can I get an alternate power source at night as fully charged battery is not sufficient enough to power up my load?

    [Reply]

  20. Jeff said:

    Good job my friend, Good job. Keep it up don’t ever stop. I’m with ya man. I want to use this process to spinn-up a huge turbine and rock the world with it. Imagine, free power for the poor and povertized nations. Real releif for our unfortunate brothers and sisters of different nationalities. Keep it up man don’t ever stop. Good job, Jeff

    [Reply]

  21. mobin said:

    how much material for 2 kw unit will cost ?how much the inverter will cost for it ?
    how much the battery will cost?
    how long one can run it 2 kw motor for how long.

    57 northumberland road
    North Harrow
    London
    UK

    [Reply]

  22. Paul Mayrhofer said:

    Good clean informative video. Thanks for the details for this panel assembly.

    [Reply]

  23. BGC said:

    what is the amperege of this pannel?

    [Reply]

  24. tim h. said:

    awsome thanks for the ideas the price has been holding me off but this will help

    [Reply]

  25. gary streight said:

    hi,

    what materials can i use as the bus bars. can i use copper wire instead of the aluminium strip.

    cheers, Gary

    [Reply]

  26. creative said:

    Can you provide more information on this? take care

    [Reply]

  27. Laurie said:

    Once the panels are built; Do you explain how to connect them to appliances and other applications?

    [Reply]

  28. Brighton said:

    Hie
    my name is Brighton l stay in Zimbabwe l am interested in building solar panels and installing them send me your contact details so that l will keep in touch , my aim is one day the whole zimbabwe would be a solar country

    [Reply]

  29. Brighton said:

    Hie Mark
    my name is Brighton l stay in Zimbabwe l am interested in starting my own plant which will be building solar panel send me your contact details so that l will keep in touch .e-mail me your contact details here is my e-mail address : brightongondo@yahoo.com

    [Reply]

  30. Ruthira Baskaren said:

    Great demo and it is an excellent show for the new guys want to learn how to build solar panel. Believe me it is a School project for school children and great idea for hobbyist,

    Good Job

    [Reply]

Leave a comment